5/21/14

Grand Jury Report: County Employee Evaluations

The Contra Costa Grand Jury has released a report (available here) which recommends that all cities develop five-year technology plans.    The report's summary starts with:

The use of technology by cities has increased dramatically over the past 20 years, from simply playing a support role in providing desktop computers and network servers to being a catalyst for productivity and touching virtually every department operation.  As demand for technology applications has expanded, the need for cities to develop integrated plans has become critical.    

5/17/14

Grand Jury Report: Planning For Technology

The Contra Costa Grand Jury has released a report (available here) which recommends that all cities develop five-year technology plans.    The report's summary starts with:

The use of technology by cities has increased dramatically over the past 20 years, from simply playing a support role in providing desktop computers and network servers to being a catalyst for productivity and touching virtually every department operation.  As demand for technology applications has expanded, the need for cities to develop integrated plans has become critical.    

5/16/14

Contra Costa Times: Contra Costa grand jury recommends employees that are mandated reporters be trained to report child sex abuse

Full text of the news article follows: 

Before last fall, there were virtually no Contra Costa County cities with policies guiding training employees to report suspected child abuse to authorities, and even now few cities have implemented such training, according to a new report released by the county's civil grand jury.


5/14/14

Grand Jury Report: Training City Personnel In Reporting Child Abuse

The Contra Costa Grand Jury has released a report (available here) which recommends that all public entity employees and volunteers be trained to recognize and report suspected child abuse.    The report's summary states:

Multiple lawsuits alleging child abuse, and the failure to report suspected instances of the same, have revealed that many employees of the public entities, including those of the cities, do not understand their duties to identify and report suspected or known instances of child abuse.   This failure is due, in large part, to inadequate training of employees, and other personnel, in their legal obligations as “mandated reporters”.